Diabetes

Diabetes is a common condition with more than two million people with diabetes the UK.

It is also a complex long term condition characterised by the accumulation of glucose in the body as a result of the inability of the body to produce or use insulin effectively

Diabetes, untreated, or poorly managed can lead to damage to other organs (kidneys, eyes, heart nerves and blood vessels) and tends to worsen other risk factors such as smoking and hypertension. It is estimated that 11.6% of all deaths amongst those aged 20-79 in England are as a result of diabetes1.

Managing complex long-term conditions is always challenging but we know that good management of diabetes can lead to improved outcomes. Delivering safe and high quality care for people with diabetes is also a challenge. Patients who are admitted are likely to experience longer lengths of stay and the incidence of patients admitted from the community with Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) rose in 2010-11 1. Applying best practices that aim to minimise risk and improve safety must be a priority for people with diabetes.

The aim of this section is to provide resources that enable improvements to the safe care of people with diabetes.

References

  1. The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership. National Diabetes Audit 2010-2011: Report 2: Complications and Mortality. Leeds, 2012. Accessed 24 March 2013

All resources on diabetes